gibbon adaptations , how does a gibbon protect itself

Gibbon Adaptations

Gibbon Adaptations

Gibbons are complete tree dwellers, that is, arboreal in nature. This particular trait not only makes them quite different from most other terrestrial animals, but also has made them develop significant adaptive measures to survive in the world.

The most obvious adaptation in gibbons, which is anatomic in nature, is their elongated hands. Upon a little observation, it would be seen that their hands are not proportionate to their body- they are relatively longer. This is because of their way of locomotion. Gibbons move around by grabbing hold of branches of trees and moving forward- just like people do with ropes in circus acts.More...

 

How Does A Gibbon Protect Itself ?

How Does A Gibbon Protect Itself ?

Gibbons are a reserved lot of animals. They do not usually mix with any other species, nor do they easily leave their own “territory”. Gibbons usually form a monogamous family group which includes one to three offspring along with an adult pair. When the offspring become sexually mature, they leave their parents and the territory itself in search for a partner as well as a new territory. So naturally a gibbon is very protective about their own zone of habitat. They demark their own territory by singing aloud. Their songs are usually ten to twenty minutes long, according to the species.

A gibbon family needs to protect its territory mainly from the other gibbons of the same gender. Now due to the strong attachment of the gibbons to their own territory, they lose focus if for some reason their territory gets destroyed. More...