Theory Of A Dream

Theory Of A Dream

Although many in the field disregard work furnished by the renowned psychiatrist, Sigmund Freud; the man still remains an important name to reckon with in the domain of dream interpretation. Freud elevated dreams to a very high pedestal by addressing them as a medium to gain insight to one’s subconscious mind. This able man segregated the human consciousness into the three realms of ego, the superego and the id.

He believed that in coping with the hectic daily routines, human beings seldom get the opportunity to recognize or deal with their latent fears, concerns and passions; that tend to manifest in the guise of dreams.

As per Freud's theory of dream interpretation, dreams can be regarded as channels of free association, wish fulfillment, stress processing, and memory exploration. The term ‘free association’ implies illustrating the first thing that comes to one’s mind without any apprehensions. This means that in a dream rather than concentrating on the content, one should pay importance to the feeling that the dream has generated within the dreamer. The emotion thereby experienced is a reflection of the individual’s true state of mind in real life situation. In terms of wish fulfillment, dreams also hold special significance. More often than not, human beings are unable to come to terms with their deep inner sentiments, aspirations and anxieties. Dreams could, therefore, serve as a medium of acquainting the dreamer with desires that he or she longs for or camouflages in real life. These dreams, in turn, also aid an individual in understanding his or her own needs in better light.

These are just some of the basics of Freud’s work. However, his real work in this domain is extremely detailed and requires analysis of every component of the dream.

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Theory Of A Dream