Sigmund Freud Theories

Sigmund Freud Theories

As per the famous Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud, every human being has a conscious and subconscious state of mind. It is the unconscious state that is the storehouse of an individual’s hidden desires and moments of emotional hurt, that are concealed from the conscious mind.

His psychodynamic view of human behavior further illustrates that human behavior is driven by these inner emotions that at times are let lose in the form of a slip of the tongue and dreams. In order to throw further light on this subject, Freud put forth a personality model that segregated human personality into three segments namely; the id, the ego and the superego.

The id represents the unrefined inherent traits of human personality such as hunger and sexual desires that the reality generally keeps a check on. The demands of the id cannot be always paid heed to as there have to be an appropriate place and time for the fulfillment of such needs. The part of one’s personality that facilitates the assimilation of a person into society, by focusing on the norms of the real world and thereby not giving into the demands of the id is referred to as the ego. The id is the center of higher intellect and prudence.

The last element of Freud’s personality model is the superego. This demonstrates the righteous norms of the society that have been instilled within us during our lifetime. The superego can be further divided into the conscience that prevents a human being from indulging in immoral behavior and the ego-ideal that promotes the morally correct attitude. Although Freud’s theory is largely appreciated in the field of psychology, there are many who are critical about the concept owing to the lack of scientific evidence.

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Sigmund Freud Theories