Growing Wormwood

Growing Wormwood

Wormwood is famously known for its worm curing abilities. It was used extensively by people to get rid of worms in their body. It is one of the most ancient plants known to mankind. The first usage of this herb dates way back to 1600 BC in Egypt. The ancient Egyptians used it for its medicinal properties.

This plant can reach a height of 3 to 6 feet. It does not require too much maintenance, so if you are planning to grow wormwoods at home, you need not spend a lot of time and energy on them.

The best time to sow wormwood seeds is in the early spring season. Because these seeds are minute, you need not sow them deep in the soil and cover them with layers of mud. A light covering on top would be perfect. Sow as many seeds as possible because these are pretty small plants. The more you sow, the more you can use them effectively for long periods. These plants have been credited to cause extensive damage to plants in and around the area. They produce toxic substances called absinthin, which damages other crops around the area. They also poison the soil with toxic substances. It is advisable to grow them separately.

Do not place these plants under direct sunlight. Partial shade is necessary for their survival. Water the soil regularly to prevent the plant from withering and drying. It is better to water whenever you find the soil drying up. Harvest the leaves in spring season.

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Growing Wormwood