Pathophysiology Diagram Of Hemorrhagic Stroke

Pathophysiology Diagram Of Hemorrhagic Stroke

Hemorrhagic stroke is a condition that occurs mainly due to a rupture of a blood vessel in the brain. The blood vessel bursts and releases blood into the brain. Research shows that nearly 20 percent of the strokes that occur overall are hemorrhagic in nature.

Once the arteries rupture they are incapable of carrying blood and oxygen to the brain and it causes the cells to die. Another reason for hemorrhagic stroke is the blood that flows into the brain due to the rupture forms a clot inside the brain and damages the brain tissue. This could severely damage the brain functioning.

A hemorrhagic stroke is the least common. However, it is more frequently fatal when compared to an ischemic stroke overall. Hemorrhagic stroke is of two types. Each one is named after the part of the brain that is affected by the bleeding.

The subarachnoid hemorrhage is a condition that refers to the bleeding that takes place in the gap between the top of the brain and the skull. The most common cause of a subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke is aneurysm. It is characterized by an abnormal swelling of a blood vessel within the brain followed by rupturing of that swollen blood vessel.

The intracerebral hemorrhage occurs due to the bleeding between the brain and the tissue. Mostly intracerebral hemorrhages are the ones that are caused by a drastic change in the functioning of the arteries. It can also happen due to a long lasting hypertension or high blood pressure. However, many of the other potential causes are due to diseases like cancer and brain tumors.

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Pathophysiology Diagram Of Hemorrhagic Stroke