Ischemic Stroke Recurrent Rate

Ischemic Stroke Recurrent Rate

Stroke is one of the most common causes of death in the United States. It is also a leading cause of neurological disability in adults. Strokes account for the maximum number of hospitalizations for neurological diseases. Treatment of an acute stroke has the potential of decreasing death and disability.

However, it is the preventive measures that will be more effective and successful for reducing the after effects of stroke. A patient who has recovered from a mild stroke or has had a recent transient ischemic attack, also called TIA, can be at a higher risk of stroke recurrence. Strokes when they recur cause physical and intellectual disability. A person who has been through a stroke will have to go through a long-term institutionalization for disability.

There is a lot of evidence from observation based studies and clinical trials that recurrent ischemic stroke can actually be prevented. The basic control of the stroke causing risk factors is the key for preventing the first stroke from occurring. A patient who has symptoms of cardiovascular diseases is most likely to develop a stroke. If preventive measures are taken to reduce the risk, stroke recurrence can be controlled.

Preventive measures would include giving up habits like smoking and drinking alcohol. In addition, it also includes eating less meat and changing the diet plan. Taking up exercise as a part of their daily regime are all essential. On a clinical level it would mean that the patients have to keep their blood pressure and cholesterol levels under a check.

According to one study, the 5-year cumulative rate of recurrence of ischemic thrombotic stroke was 42 percent in men and 24 percent in women. And, the long term recurrence of stroke is estimated to be between 4 percent and 14 percent annually.

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Ischemic Stroke Recurrent Rate