Information About Tetanus In Animals

Information About Tetanus In Animals

Tetanus is caused by a bacterium, Clostridium tetani. This bacterium lives in soil, manure and stomachs of animals. In fact, the bacterium can survive for many years in soil and manure and this puts grazing animals at risk, especially if they have a wound.

Tetanus in animals results when the bacterium enters the body through a wound or damaged tissue. The bacterium needs oxygen-free environment to replicate and produce infection and that is why deep wounds are more susceptible to tetanus infections. As the bacterium multiplies, it produces toxins, which bind with the nerves of the body causing tetanus in animals.

From the time the bacterium enters the body and the disease manifests itself varies from two to three days to thirty days or more. This time period is dependent on how long it takes for the wound where the bacterium enters to have a low level of oxygen.

Tetanus in animals is difficult to treat just like in humans. However, if signs of the disease are caught early on, it can be treated with appropriate use of antitoxins and antibiotics. Usually a low dose of antitoxins should be given within a few hours of the injury. Unfortunately, the treatment for tetanus in animals is quite expensive and is not always successful. That is why many animals often die with the disease.

There is a tetanus vaccination program for grazing animals like cattle and sheep which involves vaccinating the animals against this dreaded disease. If the vaccination program is followed, it can help in the prevention of the disease.

More Articles :

Information About Tetanus In Animals