The Origin Of Boxing Day

The Origin Of Boxing Day

Though the name suggests, Boxing Day has nothing to do with the sport of boxing. On the contrary, Boxing Day is a day of giving. Boxing Day is celebrated in some of the commonwealth countries such as Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Boxing Day is celebrated a day after Christmas, i.e. on the 26 December. On this day, gifts are given away to the less privileged class of people. These gifts are generally given by people of a higher class. In the earlier days these gifts were packed in boxes so that they could be transported easily and this is the why this day got its name. Boxing Day is also known as St. Stephen’s Day.

The origin of Boxing Day can be traced back to the 19th century when it was started under Queen Victoria’s rule. On this day, the higher classes would thank the people of the lower classes working for them for their all year round services. The lower classes would consist of maids, cooks, drivers, and other service workers, and the people of the higher classes would give them gifts in the form of money, clothing and food.

The other theory is that merchants used to give away boxes containing food, fruit or money to their servants as well as trades people. This is how the day got its name Boxing Day. One more theory suggests that this is the day when alms boxes placed outside the churches were opened and their contents were distributed to the poor, the day after Christmas.

In all of the above theories, the common thought is that of giving and helping the poor and needy.

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The Origin Of Boxing Day