Riboflavin And Insect Bite Prevention

Riboflavin And Insect Bite Prevention

Home remedies suggested that vitamins, garlic and other foods helped people ward off insects bites. It was believed that the characteristic odor produced after consumption of these foods prevented mosquito and other insect bites.

This stemmed out of the fact that mosquitoes are only attracted to sweet odors.

Moreover, scientific studies dating back to the 1960s suggest that taking small doses of the supplement three times a day during biting season helps to produce a skin odor that mosquitoes find repulsive. But more recent studies have shown that assertion to be a myth. In a study published in 2005 in the Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association, scientists had a group of subjects take vitamin B supplements every day for eight weeks, while a second group took vitamin C and a third took no supplements. Once every two weeks, the scientists used swarms of mosquitoes to examine whether the supplements were having any effect. Although each subject's attractiveness to the mosquitoes varied considerably, over all there was no evidence that vitamin B did anything to help.

Another study by scientists in Brazil tested it by administering vitamin B droplets to animals and exposing them to female mosquitoes (the only ones that bite). They found no difference in attractiveness between the vitamin B group and control groups. Careful scientific trials have failed to show any mosquito repelling effects as a result of taking oral vitamin B, including Riboflavin. Infact, the scientific community believes that this is a myth since various studies have disproved Vitamin B as a mosquito repellant.

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Riboflavin And Insect Bite Prevention