Hernia And Hip Pain

Hernia And Hip Pain

Hip pain is caused for a variety of reasons, some of which are not directly related but are generated because of problems in adjacent areas. One of the causes for hip pain is a hernia or defect of the abdominal wall.

The leg is attached to the torso of the body at the hip joint, where the head of the femur – the thigh bone – swivels in a socket comprising the pelvic bones. While problems in the joint itself are the cause of many hip joint pains, many more are the result of conditions in the adjacent structures.

Frequently the source of hip joint pain is trauma resulting from inflammation in the hip area. Inflammation results in pain with swelling, redness and warmth. These are symptoms of some underlying problem. Hip pain is non-specific which requires the expertise of a health care practitioner to find the underlying cause.

When the contents of a body cavity bulge out of the area where they are normally contained, the condition is known as a hernia. These are generally portions of the intestine or abdominal fatty tissue normally held in a thin membrane which in the natural state lies within the cavity. Most often a hernia is understood to be a condition of the lower torso though the term could be used for bulges in other areas as well.

A hernia can cause nerve branches to become inflamed which radiates to the hip joint. This is more prevalent in sports hernias. In such cases, surgery is generally warranted.

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Hernia And Hip Pain