Pressure Ulcers And Low Hemoglobin

Pressure Ulcers And Low Hemoglobin

Risk factor for development of pressure ulcers in hospitals include fewer nursing care hours per patient per day, amount of time spent in bed versus a chair, malnutrition, and low hemoglobin levels, age and diagnosis. Patients with hemoglobin < =12gm/dl may have difficulty in healing pressure ulcers because of impaired tissue oxygenation. Pressure ulcer and hemoglobin in blood is closely associated with each other.

Patients with pressure ulcer often have hemoglobin level of 10g/100 ml or lower because of decreases appetite, loss of serum and electrolytes from the ulcer, infection and generalized debilitation. Low hemoglobin level cause lower blood oxygen content and, therefore, a decrease in oxygen delivered to the tissue. Deficiency of various nutrients causes malformed red blood cells, which further aggravate the problem.

A report by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1980 concluded that individuals with hemoglobin less than 12gm/dL were more than twice as likely to develop pressure ulcers as those with hemoglobin greater than 12gm/dL, prompting correction of anemia and monitoring of hemoglobin levels to optimize wound healing. Low hemoglobin levels are associated with pressure ulcer development and delayed wound healing due to reduced oxygen content in the tissues.

Other factor contributing to pressure ulcer development are protein or iron deficiency, vitamin C deficiency, incontinence, and poor local blood supply. Pressure ulcer or bed sore can be prevented by adding key supplements to your diet like iron, zinc, vitamins and proteins. Iron will help to raise the level of hemoglobin in blood while other vitamins and mineral will help in healing process and in formation of red blood cells. Therefore a diet rich in iron, vitamins and mineral like iron and zinc should be given to a patient with pressure ulcer.

More Articles :

Pressure Ulcers And Low Hemoglobin